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I am not a professional nor an expert in Cactacea or Mammillaria taxonomy. Any help with ID and spelling are always welcome. To up-date my list I've been using many books, journals, catalogs and other web-sites. It's been helpful, but I have more work to do. I only ship to the main 48 States. We offer 72+ hour heat packs for $3.00 each. Please read the front page for ordering information.

Note: We ship bare root with out pots. They are to heavy to ship in their pots. You can buy these plants at the J & J greenhouse in there nice pots.

Mammillaria Family

    Cochemiea setispina - Sometime found as Cochemies pondii ssp. setispina. Cochemiea pondii subsp. setispina (syn: Mammillaria setispina) is a local form of Cochemiea pondii distinguished from the type species for having only 1-4 central spines, of which the upper one straight, lower one longest and hooked, 2-5 cm long. The flowers are very showy, long, red, narrowly tubular with bilateral symmetry and fit for hummingbird pollination.San Borgia, Baja California, Mexico. Growing in 3 1/2 inch pots. - left to right - #1, #2 - $13.00 each

   Coryphantha cornifera ssp. echinus - Mostly solitary globular cactus or branched with age, forming large clumps up to 80 cm in diameter, at low elevation in Brewster County, Texas. This species is one of those Coryphanthas which pass a purely radial-spined youth stage in which they are already floriferous. The name Coryphantha pectinata (Engelmann) Britton & Rose was used for plants lacking central spines, but after several years the typical 3-4 central spines appear, giving the plant its sea urchin appearance. USA (western Texas), Mexico (Coahuila, Chihuahua). Growing in a 4 1/2" x 4 1/2" pot. - #1 @ $35.00

   Coryphantha macromeris - USA - New Mexico, Texas and Mexico - hihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, San Luis Potosí, Tamaulipas and Zacatecas. The typical Coryphantha macromeris has a very large population comprising many thousands and possibly hundreds of thousands of individuals. The flowers of Coryphantha macromeris are virtually identical to those of Mammillaria wrightii and Escobaria vivipara; in the absence of vegetative material, flowers may be unidentifiable. Growing in 4 1/2 inch pots. - left to right - #1, #2 @ $13.00 each

   Coryphantha ramillosa - Coryphantha ramillosa is a small cactus species, appearing bristly or shaggy grey, brown, or whitish. Flowers from young areoles near the apex, funnel shaped, colour varying from pale pink to deep rose purple with darker mid-stripe, glossy. Coryphantha ramillosa has a wide range in southwest Texas along the Rio Grande in Brewster and southern Terrell counties, and on a substantial portion of northern Mexico on the neighboring Chihuahua and Coahuila. Nice plant from a old collection. Growing in a 6" x 5" pot. - #1 @ $40.00

   Epithelantha bokei - Epithelantha bokeiis a slow-growing mini cactus (usually solitary), with only 2-3 cm of stem height, covered so densely with closely appressed tiny white spines that the plants appear to be completely white and smooth to the touch. Flowers are pale pink or yellowish, very delicate, appearing in July. South Texas and Mexico. Growing in 3 inch pots. - left to right - #1, #2, #3, #4 @ $13.00 each

    Epithelantha unguispina - A nice collection plant. Epithelantha micromeris subs. unguispina (best known under its old name Epithelantha unguispina) is similar to the type species but usually a little larger and free clustering with a distinct, slightly long projecting black-tipped central spines, also the pink flowers are larger than the others. It is a miniature globose cactus, erect, clumping over time, not deep-seated in substrate, appearing ashy grey and relatively rough in general aspect. Monterrey and adjacent areas, Nuevo Leon, North-East Mexico. Growing in a 5 1/2" x 4' clay pot. front, top & back photos - #1 lg @ $60.00

    Escobaria hesteri 'white spine form' - Escobaria hesteri is a dwarf cactus unbranched, except in old age, ultimately offsetting to form clusters & eventually, low many-stemmed mounds 5-20(-30) cm in diameter. Small but showy near the top of the stems (18-25 long, 20-34 mm in diameter), gorgeous deep rose-purple to magenta with a paler throat.Southwestern USA, Texas. Growing in 3 inch pots. - left to right - #1, #2, #3 @ $10.00 each

    Escobaria sneedii ssp. sneedii - Primarily it occurs on the tops of limestone ridges in areas of broken terrain, terraces, rim rock or in poorly developed limestone soil, the majority of the plants grow in cracks in the rocks on north-facing slopes between 1,400-1,800 m in elevation, rarely under cover, usually sparsely distributed among the shrubby vegetation of the high Chihuahuan desert -shrub and interior chaparral. Grows in dense clusters with as many as 100 or more stems in a clump. Each individual stem is 1.5-6(8) cm tall and 1-2,5 cm in diameter. Tubercles - cylindrical 5 mm long; On mature stems with upper surface grooved. Spines - 30 to 90 very small radials, typically white often brown at tip, fading to grey, slender and bristle-like, mostly about 1-2.5 mm long, radiating from areole and appressed against plant, sometimes with one to few short porrect centrals. Roots are fibrous. Flowers are brownish-pink in early April-May. Showy smaller, usually not opening widely, 1.2 cm long up to 1.5 cm wide; tepals brownish-pink (rarely pale yellowish, or whitish) in color, usually with midstrip darker; stigmas white to pink; Fruit: Small elongate, 1-1.5 cm long, green to somewhat reddish. Notes: The subspecies leei differs from other Escobaria in densely its clumping habit, small stem size, and tightly, almost pectinate, spination. The wild population intergrades with other forms of E. sneedii in the Guadalupe Mountains. This is apparently a neotenic variety of the species in which juvenile spination is retained throughout the life of the plant. This species is closely related to E. sneedii var. sneedii from which it differs by having deflexed spines, rather than spreading ones, brownish - pink flowers as opposed to rose-magenta ones, and seeds 1 mm long as opposed to 0.75 mm in length (01,02,05. Very small heads will make nice clumps. I've been told it's cold hardy but I have not grown it outdoors in Oklahoma. This are growing in 3 inch pots. - @ $15.00 each

 Mammillaria

   Mammillaria bocasana monstrose 'Fred' - This monstrose can also make crested stems. Spinless green blobs. Depends on what time of the year they can have white, pink and red growing tips. All growing on there own roots. Flowers are cream color and can make red seed pods. These are growing in 3 1/2 inch pots. - left to right - #1, #2, #3, #4 @ $20.00 each  

   Mammillaria bombycina - Is one of the most popular and beautiful species that will produce clumps, as a washing up bowl. It combines clean, glassy white radial spines with hooked reddish-brown centrals. The spines are quite sticking. This plant will produce several complete circles of contrasting light carmine flowers every year. Originally described from eastern Jalisco, Mexico, additional populations have since been located in Aguascalientes just to the north. Growing in 8" x 6' x 3 1/2' bonsai pot. - front & top photos - #1 mblg @ $100.00   

    Mammillaria compressa ssp. centralifera - Is one of the innumerable local form of the very variable Mammillaria compressa. It distinguishes for the presence of long central spines, usually one, sometimes two, and for the greater amount of axillary wool. It flowers quite readily, and bright purple-pink rings around each head make this species a beautiful one at flowering time, which is usually May to June. It has the same variable characteristics of the species. Queretaro, San Luis Potosi and Tamaulipas and is more northerly distributed than the standard species. Growing in 4 1/2 pots. - left to right - #1, #2 @ $13.00 each  

   Mammillaria decipiens ssp. albescens - Nice clump forming with soft white spine and whiteish flowers. Mammillaria decipiens (a.k.a. Bird's Nest Mammillaria) is a low growing, prominently ‘nippled' cactus species, with long, bristly spines that cross each other forming a sort of bird's nest look - hence its common name. Mexico states of San Luis Potosi, Guanajuato and Queretaro. Growing in 4 1/2 inch pots. - left to right - #1, #2, #3, @ $13.00 each   

   Mammillaria geminispina ssp. nobilis - This plant is easily recognized for its long white spines that cover the new growth, flowers are carmine in late spring and sometime in autumn too. This Mammillaria gets only better looking with age. It will continue to put on more and more heads, as well as more white cotton topping. The heads form mounds that seem stacked on top of each other. Flowers are campanulate, pinkish to carmine red, with darker midveins, to 20 mm long and in diameter usually in a ring in the growth of the previous year but sometime more randomly over the body. If grown from seed, M. geminispina can take seven to eight years before flowering. Hidalgo, Queretaro and San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Growing in 4 1/2 pots. - left to right - #1, #2, #3, #4 - $18.00 each

   Mammillaria heyderi ssp. heyderi -  It is a low growing solitary plant and one of the most cold hardy of the Mammillaria. Of the related taxon belonging to Mammillaria heyderi complex the Mammillaria applanata is often the flattest but otherwise very similar to the other species and may probably repesent only a race of the same species. Texas, New Mexico and Oklahoma USA; Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, Durango, Sonora, San Luis Potosi and Veracruz, Mexico. (the var. applanata is restricted to central and southern Texas) Growing in a 4 1/2 inch pot. 1 @ $13.00

   Mammillaria heyderi -  Large plant from a old collection. It is a low growing solitary plant and one of the most cold hardy of the Mammillaria. Of the related taxon belonging to Mammillaria heyderi complex the Mammillaria applanata is often the flattest but otherwise very similar to the other species and may probably repesent only a race of the same species. Texas, New Mexico and Oklahoma USA; Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, Durango, Sonora, San Luis Potosi and Veracruz, Mexico. - the var. applanata is restricted to central and southern Texas. - Growing in a 8" x 5 1/2" clay pot. #3 @ $35.00

   Mammillaria humboldtii 'small form'-  It is one of the most beautiful species, with candid white spines and lots of bright purplish-pink flowers blooming abundantly in spring. Solitary or clumping. Hidalgo, Mexico. Growing in 3 1/2 inch pots. - left to right - #1, #2 @ $15.00 each

     Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp. beiselii - Is a solitary, or slowly branching dichotomously or basally cactus, with cream coloured 'snowy' tomentum on the top of the plant. Four subspecies are recognized, the nominate, ssp. beiselii. Globose to short cylindrical, blue-green to dark green, up to 12 cm in diameter, 8-20 cm tall. With latex. The Axil is very woolly, with tufts of white hair and long white bristles. Mammillaria karwinskiana has a very wide range in Guatemala and Mexico. Growing in a 4 1/2 inch pot. front & back photos - #1 @ $15.00

    Mammillaria karwinskiana ssp. nejapensis variegata - Interesting variegation, gives the plant a glow when grown in good light. Mammillaria nejapensis is very variable, especially for the length of the spines, and  at the beginning there were two recognized varietiesvar. brevispina and var. longispina, with respectively short and long spines, but they are merely local or individual variations. This species branches basally or more frequently forms large colonies by dichotomous division. Growing in 4 1/2 inch pots. - front & back photos - left to right - #1, #2 @ $35.00 each

   Mammillaria lenta - Mammillaria lenta is a very slow growing succulent that branches basally to form quite large flat-topped mounds of off-white to white with age. Some plants will begin to offset when just a few cm across, while others are more reluctant to produce offsets. Slower growing than the somewhat similar M. plumosa. Produces rings of large pure white flowers with a purplish-pinkish stripe, 20(-25) mm long and 25 mm in diameter. Stigmas are a bright olive-green. Perianth segment pointed. Coahuila, Mexico. Growing in a 4 1/2 inch pot. - #1 @ $13.00

   Mammillaria matudae - Is a columnar cactus that offsets basally to form wide clusters in time. The stem is quite tidy in youth and tends to recline as it elongates giving the old plant a characteristic sprawling habit. Each head is surrounded by a complete ring, 2-3 flowers thick, of starlike magenta flowers usually just 2-5 cm from the growing tip of the cactus. There are ample variations among spines colour.Origin and Habitat: Mammillaria matudae is endemic to Mexico, where it is distributed in the state of and Mexico close to the border with the state of Michoacán, Guerrero Mexico (Northern America). Altitude range: 700-1250 metres above sea level. This species is probably found in deciduous forest. The threats to this species are unknown. The pink ring is from the last flower crop. Growing in 4 1/2 inch pots. - left to right - #1, #2, #3, #4 @ $13.00 each

   Mammillaria parkinsonii -  Mammillaria parkinsonii is a woolly, mound forming species, that, as it ages, tufts by dichotomic division forming compact bunches up to 60 cm in diameter or more. This species is especially variable in spine length. This is one of the Mammillaria commonly called "Owl Eye Cactus", known for dichotomous branching (forking or dividing into two parts). Although dichotomous branching is not a common occurrence in cacti in general, it happens for some reason in this particular species. What is interesting about this cactus is that it began as a single head, one head became two, and so on. Flowers are diurnal, funnel-shaped, pale yellow with a central brownish or pinkish midvein. Flowers bud are surrounded by a mass of white wool. Central Mexico. Growing in a 10 inch pot. - #1 lg @ $25.00

   Mammillaria petrophila -  Not sure of the name on this one? If it's Mammillaria petrophila it should have yellow flowers. - front & back photos - Growing in a 8' bowl. #1 @ $40.00

   Mammillaria plumosa 'Fat Boy' - Very round fat stemmed form of Mammaillaria plumosa. Sometime called the 'Fearther Cactus'. Very soft touchable spines. Will have white flowers thought out the fall and winter. They make nice fearthery clusters. Mexican states of Coahuila and Nuevo Leon. Growing in a 10" x 3" bowl . #1 xlg @ $50.00

   Mammillaria prolifera ssp. roseiflora - Came to me with this name. Not really sure on the ID. I think it looks alot like a Mammillaria prolifera with lighter colored spines? It's a heavy bloomer, dark pink flowers and will make light-red seed pots. Will make nice clumps. Growing in 3 1/2 pots. - left to right - $13.00 each     

      Mammillaria rekoi ssp. leptacantha - In the time  Mammillaria rekoi has been variously named. but nowadays there are only three recognized subspecies: The subspecies 'rekoi' grows mostly with a solitary stem.  It only has 4 central spines, with the lower one  hooked, and 20 white radial spines per areole. The subspecies 'aureispina' sometimes grows multiple stems.  It has 5-7 central spines ,and 20-23 yellow golden radial spines per areole. The subspecies 'leptacantha' forms clumps frequently.  It has 4-6 central spines that are curved and hooked, with 27-30 radial spines per areole. Oaxaca: Mitla, Mexico. - Growing in a 6 inch pot. - front & back photos - #1 @ $15.00

   Mammillaria rekoi ssp. leptacantha - In the time  Mammillaria rekoi has been variously named. but nowadays there are only three recognized subspecies: The subspecies 'rekoi' grows mostly with a solitary stem.  It only has 4 central spines, with the lower one  hooked, and 20 white radial spines per areole. The subspecies 'aureispina' sometimes grows multiple stems.  It has 5-7 central spines ,and 20-23 yellow golden radial spines per areole. The subspecies 'leptacantha' forms clumps frequently.  It has 4-6 central spines that are curved and hooked, with 27-30 radial spines per areole. Oaxaca: Mitla, Mexico. - Growing in a 14"x6" pot. - front & back photos - #1 xlg @ $140.00 will need to be shipped in it's own box.

   Mammillaria spinosissima forma rubrispina - Columnar plants, usually solitary but they can form pups on old plants. M. spinosissima is very variable due to its wide area of origin in Mexico. The color of the spines vary from red or rust to white. The “rubrispina” selection forms nice clumps of columns, densely spined with bright coppery red spines. Growing in 4 1/2 inch pots. - front to back photos - left to right - #1, #2 @ $13.00 each

    Mammillaria spinosissima 'Un Pico' - This is a stable genetic mutation from a very variable spined species Mammillaria spinosissima, in which each areole only produces one spine, but some perfectly spineless areoles are also present. Mammillaria pilcayensis cv. Un Pico is an easy to grow cultivar, just as a classic cactus, don't requires any special treatment, but need as much light as possible without burning the plant to encourage the heaviest spine formation. It is a great starter plant for the cactus grower, that readily builds up into a cluster of stems highlighted by reddish spines, further decorated by rings of purple-pink blooms. Growing in a 10"x7"x4" pot. - front & back photos - #1 blg @ $85.00

      Mammillaria surculosa - Synonym: Dolichnthele surculosa - It's a low-growing widely spreading cactus forming crowded mats or mounds of small heads and relatively large, bright yellow flowers. The most obvious characteristic for associating it with Dolichothele are the prominent tubercles and the comparatively larger yellow flowers than those of the average. Taproot, merging with stem forming a stout tuberous rootstock. It has one solitary, hooked, needle-like, slender, somewhat twisted, amber yellow or brownish-yellow, darker tipped, up to 20 mm long. Radial spines: 12-15, white, 8-10 mm long, acicular, stiff , bristle-like, whitish to pale yellow, interlacing, flattened. Flowers are funnel form, sulphur yellow, lemon scented, not more than 2,5 cm long and approx. 18 mm in diameter at anthesis. Tepals few, fused at the base, chrome-yellow with red tips and brownish-pink stripes on the backside. Origin and Habitat: Tamaulipas - nearby Miquihiuany to the north of San Luis Potosí - nearby La Inconada, North-Eastern Mexico. Altitude: 950-1200 metres above sea level. Growing in 3 1/2 inch pots. - left to right - 1#, #2, #3 @ $10.00 each

   Mammillaria surculosa - Synonym: Dolichnthele surculosa - It's a low-growing widely spreading cactus forming crowded mats or mounds of small heads and relatively large, bright yellow flowers. The most obvious characteristic for associating it with Dolichothele are the prominent tubercles and the comparatively larger yellow flowers than those of the average. Taproot, merging with stem forming a stout tuberous rootstock. It has one solitary, hooked, needle-like, slender, somewhat twisted, amber yellow or brownish-yellow, darker tipped, up to 20 mm long. Radial spines: 12-15, white, 8-10 mm long, acicular, stiff , bristle-like, whitish to pale yellow, interlacing, flattened. Flowers are funnel form, sulphur yellow, lemon scented, not more than 2,5 cm long and approx. 18 mm in diameter at anthesis. Tepals few, fused at the base, chrome-yellow with red tips and brownish-pink stripes on the backside. Origin and Habitat: Tamaulipas - nearby Miquihiuany to the north of San Luis Potosí - nearby La Inconada, North-Eastern Mexico. Altitude: 950-1200 metres above sea level. Growing in 4 1/2 inch pots. - left to right - 1#, #2 @ $13.00 each

   Mammillaria uncinata - Fat dark-green with short hooked spines. Solitary or slowly offsetting cactus. Stems:  Dark blue-green, 6 - 10 cm high, 8 - 10 cm in diameter.  In the wild it grows very flat, but under cultivation it grows as globular as any other. Radial spines: 3 - 6, upper ones shorter and stronger, straight or slightly curved, pinkish to greyish white, 5 - 6 mm in length. Central spines:  1, hooked, pinkish grey to dark purplish brown, with dark tips, up to 10 mm long.Widely distributed in Mexico - Hidalgo, San Luis Potosi, Mexico, Morelos, Puebla, Oaxaca, Guerrero, Durango, Queretaro, Guanajuato, Zacatecas, Aguascalients, Michoacan and Jalisco. Habitat: Grows at 1.500 - 2.800 m in altitude. Growing in 4 1/2 inch pots. - left to right - #1, #2, #3 @ $13.00 each  

   Mammillaria sp. #1 - This may be Mammillaria wagneriana. Grayish-green with four heads. Should have pink flowers. Plant came from an old collection that had lost its name tag. Growing in a 10" x 5" clay pot. #1 @ $50.00

   Mammillaria sp. #2 - Plant came from an old collection that had lost its name tag. All the heads are growing from a cut main stem. Dark blusish gray-green. I've not seen it flower. Growing in a 8" x 6" inch pot. #2 @ $45.00

   Mammillaria sp. #4 - Plant came from an old collection that had lost its name tag. One large head. I've not seen the the flowers. Flower color always help with plant ID. A name I'm looking at for this is Mammillaria polyedra. Growing in a 10" x 4" pot. #4 @ $40.00

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