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I am not a professional nor an expert in Aloe taxonomy. Any help with ID and spelling are always welcome. Photos are for reference only. To up-date my list I've been using many books, journals, catalogs and other web-sites. It's been helpful, but I have more work to do. I only ship to the main 48 States. I can ship in the winter. I do have 72+ hour heat packs for $3.00 each. No international shipping. Please read the front page for ordering information.

  Aloe dichotoma (South Africa northern Cape region and Namibia. Namaqualand and Bushmanland. from near Nieuwoudtville northwards into Namibia and eastwards to Upington and Kenhardt. It occurs in desert and semi-desert rocky areas where it receives rainfall, if at all, in the winter. It mostly occurs in black rock formations (called ''ysterklip'') which absorbs a lot of heat during the hot summer. (Average summer temp. is 38°C). The rocks anchor the plants which have a spread-root-system. The quiver tree is proof against frost. The copious nectar of its blossoms draws birds and insects as well as baboons that can strip a tree of its flowers in a short time. Being one of the only tree forms in its arid habitat, Aloe dichotoma oftentimes plays host to huge colonial nests of social weaver birds. The plants are usually found growing singly but in some areas the plants grow in large groups, giving the effect of a forest.  It is probably the best known aloe that form an extremely tough tree with densely rounded crown as a result of the repeatedly forked branches. It is one of the biggest members of the genus Aloe and may reach an age of over 80 years and a height of approximately 7(-9) metres with up to 1 m of diameter at ground level. This is one of the most branched and tree-like species of aloe. Smooth, covered with a thin layer of whitish powder that helps to reflect away the hot sun's rays. Typically, the trunk tapers from a thick base towards the top and begins to branch and re-branch dichothocomously at about half way up the trunk, earning the plant its specific epithet for this dichotomous pattern. The bark on the trunk is rather hard and forms beautiful golden brown scales, but beware, the edges of these scales are razor sharp. The pith is soft, light and spongy. About 30cm long and 5cm wide, blue-green, fleshy, bearing a narrow brownish-yellow margins margin of thorns. Leaves are arranged in a spiralled terminal rosette in old plants, but in juvenile plants they are ranked in vertical rows. These rosettes at the tips of the forked branches usually form a dense, rounded crown. In this species the old dry leaves drop off so that the leafy rosettes only remain at the tips of the branches, leaving the rest of their length clean. It has a spread-root-system the roots are somewhat fleshy. The flowers are branch panicles up to 30 cm tall from the base of the peduncle to the apex of the terminal of the raceme. They are bright canary yellow, held close to the leaves, at the tips of the branches, and are fairly short and carried erect. The flowers are rather short and rounded in shape and not nearly as showy as many other species of aloes. Growing in 3 1/2 inch pots. Needs well draining soil. Good bright light.) 6 in stock @ $15.00 each

  Aloe erinacea (Namibia, Lüderitz district and southwards to Witputs. Grows in very arid areas in rocky and sandy soils on the northern hills and mountains at 900 - 1350 m. in altitude. Aloe erinacea produces nectar, and is therefore pollinated by sugar birds as well as winged and crawling insects such as ants which are small enough to enter the flower tube in which the nectar is stored. After fertilization, the fruit, which is called a capsule, grows quickly and splits into three parts in spring and summer. The seeds are small, up to 4 mm and slightly winged, enabling it to be dispersed by the wind. The plant in itself is very tough, and can often survive for several seasons without water, at which point the leaves turn reddish, a sign generally associated with stress. Only recently discovered (botanically, that is) in the mid 1980's in Namibia, it seems strange that such an impressive plant could have remained unknown for so long. It is a winter-growing species, related and very similar to Aloe melanacantha but it can be distinguished from the latter by its open rosettes of spreading leaves and shorter flowers. The plant is compact and almost never offsets (in cultivation), but in habitat it occurs in clusters of up to10 (or more) decumbent stems up to 50 cm tall, covered with old leaves bases. Stemless even in old specimens, or short-stemmed. Pale grayish-green, blue-grey or brownish green (in full sun), narrow, deltoid lanceolate, biconvex, keeled, leaves are curved inwards, which gives the plant its rounded shape. About 8-16 long x 3-4 cm wide, and armed with sharp white or black spines, arranged singularly along the keel and margins. They are not tender, but firm and can scrape you. Spines are up to10 mm long, and are glossy white in the younger leaves. The thorns at the leaf bases may be shorter and whitish. Simple, densely flowered. These are growing in 3 1/2 inch pots. Needs well draining soil. Good bright light.) 10 in stock @ $40.00 each

  Aloe lineata 'Blue Strap Form' (An unusual form of Aloe lineata from an area of Western Cape of the Republic of South Africa. It has blue distichous, strap like leaves instead of the typical rosettes. These are growing in 3 1/2 inch pots. Needs well draining soil. Good bright light) 11 in stock @ $13.00 each

    Aloe mcloughlinii (A beautiful Aloe with lots of color. Leaves strongly incurved, brownish with large, conspicuous white markings, teeth white with reddish tips. Short stems between leaves and roots. They grow in well draining soil and protected by shrubs or trees. From Somaliland elevation 3,926 ft.This one is growing in a 10 inch pot.) 1 - larger @ $30.00

  Aloe mcloughlinii (A beautiful Aloe with lots of color. Leaves strongly incurved, brownish with large, conspicuous white markings, teeth white with reddish tips. Short stems between leaves and roots. They grow in well draining soil and protected by shrubs or trees. From Somaliland elevation 3,926 ft.These are growing in a 8 inch pots.) 2 - smaller @ $25.00 each

  Aloe ramosissima (It is a slow growing shrub type aloe known for its many branches and smooth, white stems, and without a doubt the most profusely branched of all aloes. It will form a succulent bush up to 3 ft.+ tall and wide. Other than this low branching habit and usually smaller leaf size, it is virtually identical to Aloe dichotoma, and some consider it a subspecies of A dichotoma. Eventually forms large mounds. Stems: As mentioned before, this aloe forms many branches from the ground level. This is the only significant difference between A. dichotoma and A. ramosissima. Branching continues as the plant becomes older, resulting in a dense, almost spherical shrub. The trunk is normally very short smooth and covered with strips of satiny, waxy, powdery silver-pink-brown coloured bark, which acts as a sunscreen in the harsh climate. The plants tends to be longer-stemmed and less branched in more arid areas. Leaves: The branches end in small rosettes of fleshy, oblong leaves, each up to 6 inch long and little more then 1/2 inch wide at the base. The leaf colour is glaucous-green or yellowish green, often with a pinkish tinge. The margins have narrow edges with small brownish teeth; base encircling the stem. Flowers: Bright yellow, comparatively large, tubular; conspicuous, swollen, fleshy on a usually 3-branched short inflorescence, up to 6 to 7 inchs long. Needs well draining soil. Dose best in cooler temps. These are growing in 4 1/2 inch pots.) 4 in stock @ $28.00 each

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